Author: Nipton, CA

Broken Bow, OK to Nipton, CA

Broken Bow, OK to Nipton, CA

Students from Oklahoma visiting Nipton – the Mojave Desert

26 junior high students and their chaperones stayed in Nipton during their summer field trip through the Southwest.  They were wonderful kids and enjoyed their desolate desert experience!

Sunset Magazine, April 2017

Sunset Magazine, April 2017

Land of Opportunity

Land of Opportunity

There’s long been a sense of relief for drivers as they crest Mountain Pass and start their descent along northbound Interstate 15 into Ivanpah Valley. As Primm’s trio of casinos comes into view, traveling Las Vegans get a subconscious boost in knowing they’re almost home, while visitors perk up as they realize they’re closing in on their vacation.

But more than those casinos dot the horizon today. Off the west side of the freeway, near the foothills, appears what looks at first to be a lake in Ivanpah Valley’s long-dry lake bed. As drivers get closer, they realize the lake is actually a sea of mirrors that seem to tilt and turn in waves. And those mirrors surround three massive towers, each with a white glow that’s brighter than the nighttime lights from nearby Whiskey Pete’s.

Read more at
http://vegasseven.com/2015/04/16/ivanpah-solar-energy-land-opportunity/

Road Trip! Five Great Places to See Joshua Trees

Road Trip! Five Great Places to See Joshua Trees

On the north edge of the Mojave Preserve, the “town” of Nipton, California forms the gateway for this short but spectacular drive through a Southern Nevada Joshua tree forest, one that could easily be combined in a long day or leisurely weekend with the Cima Dome trip. Stock up on iced tea and candy bars and not much else at the Nipton Trading Post, then head east from the small hamlet on Route 164. Two miles uphill from Nipton you’ll cross the Nevada state line, and the two-lane will begin a long leftward curve — almost imperceptible at first — around the north side of Crescent Peak, the northernmost prominence in the New York Mountains. A few Joshua trees begin to appear, then a few more, and as the road enters a small canyon and starts to wind a little more, the trees become more and more abundant.

Read more at
https://www.kcet.org/socal-wanderer/road-trip-five-great-places-to-see-joshua-trees

Turning his near-ghost town into a clean-tech boomtown

Turning his near-ghost town into a clean-tech boomtown

Gerald Freeman was prospecting for gold in the Mojave Desert when he stumbled on Nipton.

In 1984, it had become a virtual ghost town. Its sole resident lived in the trading post selling sodas to the occasional wayward traveler who might briefly stop to watch freight trains rumble past on the nearby Union Pacific railroad.

But where most saw desolation, Freeman saw “a little place to make a home” and maybe some money too. The Caltech-trained geologist shelled out $200,000 to buy the tiny, tattered outpost.

For a quarter-century, Freeman struggled to make much of the place, spending roughly $1 million on restoration costs. About 20 people eventually moved into town, most living in recreational vehicles and trailers.

Read more at
http://articles.latimes.com/2011/may/04/business/la-fi-nipton-20110504

A Ghost Town, Going Green

A Ghost Town, Going Green

NIPTON, Calif. — Gerald Freeman leaned on a walking stick on a dusty hill near the four rows of his solar arrays, talking about it like an apostle on a mission. Down the road are the eucalyptus trees he planted as a potential source of biomass. And not far away, he said, he hopes to install a hydrogen system, another source of renewable fuel.

It’s all part of Mr. Freeman’s unlikely dream here in the Mojave Desert — to turn this tiny town into a community running on clean power entirely of its own making.

The dream began in earnest about 30 years ago, when Mr. Freeman, a gold miner living in Malibu, bought this ghost town — hotel and general store included. He still has a ways to go, but Nipton now produces roughly half the electricity for its fluctuating population of 30 to 70 residents from the array Mr. Freeman installed in 2010.

“The more independent we can become of outside resources, the better,” Mr. Freeman said, citing the rising cost of utility power, frequent outages and preserving the environment as motivation. “I’ve been conscious of the global warming issue since my early days in school. It’s only now beginning to be so much part of the present day. People are slow to adapt to an oncoming reality.”

Read more at
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/01/business/energy-environment/a-ghost-town-going-green.html?_r=1