Author: Nipton, CA

California town for sale for $5 million

California town for sale for $5 million

For those willing to venture off Interstate 15 at exit 286 and travel 10 miles south, the village of Nipton, California, offers these rewards: peace and quiet, sunshine, sweet water and history dating to the nineteen century.

If you really like it, you can make it your own. Literally. The 80-acre town is for sale for $5 million dollars.

What does it even mean to buy a town? Private ownership of an entire, official town is a rarity.

“It’s sort of like buying a business, said Tony Castrignano, owner/broker of Sky Mesa Realty, who represents the owners and is also their neighbor.

“There’s two aspects to it. The land, which is worth X amount of dollars per acre. Then you have the businesses, and they generate income, so when we evaluated the sale price, we took that into consideration. Believe it or not, this town generates a couple of hundred thousand dollars a year in profit.”

The price includes abundant water, a photovoltaic solar array, a general store, hotel, recreational vehicle park, campgrounds, schoolhouse and two small houses.

Read more at
https://www.reviewjournal.com/homes/real-estate-millions/california-town-for-sale-for-5-million-photos/

Got A Spare $5 Mil? Buy The Town Of Nipton From Fallout: New Vegas

Got A Spare $5 Mil? Buy The Town Of Nipton From Fallout: New Vegas

One of the greatest charms of the writing in the Fallout series is how the writers draw from real world locations and events to inspire the settings and quests for the games. This was masterfully pulled off in Fallout: New Vegas, with a large portion of the game’s characters and scenarios inspired by real places along the Nevada and California border.

As many Fallout: New Vegas fans will remember, the town of Nipton was perhaps one of the most jarring encounters in the game. The Courier encounters the tiny cluster of houses soon after heading east from the Mojave Outpost, and within seconds it becomes clear that all hell has broken loose. Powder Gangers, escapees from a nearby prison who are armed with explosives, had taken over the abandoned settlement but were soon visited by the Legion, who set up a gruesome lottery to award one lucky survivor the gift of his life. The rest were crucified and hang from large posts in the town square, a grim greeting to anyone who passes by.

If that imagery left you feeling warm and cozy with visions of domestic bliss, then you’ll be happy to hear the entire town of Nipton is up for sale. For five million dollars, you can be the owner of 80 acres of land, all the associated properties, and the city’s solar panels, which are said to keep it 50% “off the grid”. Currently Nipton has a population of six and the real estate agent working on the property says there are about six potential buyers interested. Said local resident Jim Eslinger:

“It’s quiet except for the trains and I don’t even hear the trains anymore…I sleep right through them.”

He adds, in a quote that isn’t at all scary given the fictional events of Fallout: New Vegas:

“If you own the town you can call yourself the mayor if you want to because you have all the votes.”

Read more at
http://gameranx.com/updates/id/36556/article/got-a-spare-5-mil-buy-the-town-of-nipton-from-fallout-new-vegas/

I Tried To Buy A Whole California Town. It Went Medium

I Tried To Buy A Whole California Town. It Went Medium

Nipton, California, sits just 63 miles from Las Vegas but is worlds away from its gilded, spangled skyline. Surrounded by craggy, gray hills and swathes of nut-brown desert, the unincorporated town hugs the border of the Mojave National Preserve. Amenities include: a general store, a five-room hotel, a restaurant, and a few RV parking spots. And you can buy it for $5.2 million.

I found Nipton after searching online for towns for sale around the country. There aren’t many. Cal-Nev-Ari (named for the first three letters of the three states it’s close to) and Swett, South Dakota, are two others on the block. But Nipton had a certain folksy charm that appealed to me. Curious about how you actually go about buying a town, I headed to California to check it out.

Read me at
http://studioatgizmodo.kinja.com/i-tried-to-buy-a-whole-nevada-town-it-went-medium-1790156177

Las Vegas fitness buffs defy Mojave Death Race

Las Vegas fitness buffs defy Mojave Death Race

There are many components to the Mojave Death Race, which starts and ends in Nipton, California, near the California-Nevada state line. For a reference point, Nipton, pop. 60, is 64 miles south of Las Vegas, and roughly a bazillion miles from where hell freezes over.

Heat-induced hallucinations are only one of the aforementioned components. Here are others:

• Teams of 12 (or fewer) verifiable lunatics — er, competitors.

• 24 legs of running, mountain biking and road biking through the Mojave National Reserve.

• 24-hour time limit.

• Tumbleweeds.

• Temperatures of 116 degrees. Or thereabouts.

Read more at: https://www.reviewjournal.com/sports/sports-columns/ron-kantowski/las-vegas-fitness-buffs-defy-mojave-death-race/

 

From Desolate Ranch to Eco-town

From Desolate Ranch to Eco-town

Very few people have heard of Nipton, California. And rightfully so…

The town was once a covered wagon and cattle rancher stop over a century ago. It slowly evolved into a railroad and mining town.

Today, this small town has big plans to become America’s sustainable wonderland.

Back in 1984, Caltech-trained geologist Gerald Freeman stumbled onto this town with population of one sole resident who lived in the trading post selling drinks to the rare passerby.

Seeing potential in this desolate town, he decided to invest $200,000 in the purchase of this unknown outpost.

Since then, Freeman has put a small fortune into restoring Nipton, including the installation of solar panels totaling 80-kilowatts — enough to power the majority of the town — in the hopes to be a green hospitality center for people heading into the nearby Mojave National Preserve.

Read more at: http://www.greenchipstocks.com/articles/from-desolate-ranch-to-eco-town/1324

Nipton – Oasis of Tranquility

Nipton – Oasis of Tranquility

A sign touting the best cheeseburger around lets you know you are approaching the eucalyptus-shaded desert oasis of Nipton, Calif. Gently situated on the sloping bajada leading down to the Ivanpah Valley, Nipton is a tiny spot of green in the vast eastern Mojave Desert west of Searchlight, Nevada, just ten miles off Interstate 15 — and 43 miles and a world away from Las Vegas.

Now, instead of old-time laborers coming to Nippeno Camp on their way to work in the mines, or people traveling through on their way to and from Searchlight, folks come for the great lodging accommodations at Hotel Nipton, a Spanish Territorial-style adobe building or in the unique tented cabins. They come to watch the trains, buy lottery tickets, have a conference or just have a meal. Or they come to spend time in the quiet openness of the Mojave.

Nipton owner Gerald Freeman said, “To my mind, people who live in the desert, or who like and are comfortable and prefer the desert as an environment, are quite a bit different than the type of personality that might like to live in a remote area up near San Francisco for example. Desert people are a special breed. There has been a fair amount written about the psychology of what it is that allows a person to be comfortable in the desert, and in their own skin.

“Most people are not.”

Read more: http://www.desertusa.com/dusablog/nipton-oasis-of-tranquility.html#ixzz4heI8KuHz

LA Times, December 2012

LA Times, December 2012

NIPTON, Calif. — Gerald Freeman unlocks the gate to the small power plant and goes inside. Three rows of solar collectors, elevated on troughs that track the sun’s arc like sunflowers, afford a glimpse of California’s possible energy future.

This facility and a smaller version across the road produce some 70 kilowatts of electricity, about 80% of the power required by Nipton’s 60 residents, its general store and motel.

Freeman, a Caltech-trained geologist and one-time gold mine owner, understood when he bought this former ghost town near the Nevada border that being off the grid didn’t have to mean going without power.

Read more at La Times:
http://articles.latimes.com/2012/dec/29/local/la-me-solar-future-20121229